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Tag: Customs’

  • Global Entry – Expedited Clearance for Travelers Through U.S. Customs

    International travelers, do you hate waiting on line in order to clear Customs at airports around the country? Global entry is a program established by  U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) that expedites clearance for pre-approved, low-risk travelers upon arrival in the United States.  Instead of waiting on those long lines, one is able process their clearance through Customs at Global Entry kiosks where one can scan their passport or U.S. permanent resident card, place their fingertips on the scanner for fingerprint verification, and make a customs declaration. In order to[...]

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  • Land Rover Defender Destroyed By U.S. Customs – How Can This Be Prevented?

    I have represented many importers looking to import vehicles from around the world into the United States.  For those doing so, one must ensure that the vehicle is in compliance with the laws and regulations of the Department of Transportation. Otherwise, entry into the United States will be prevented by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. If a violation is found, the importer will face the possibility of a seizure and severe penalties for failing to comply.  If you find yourself in such a situation best to contact an attorney experienced[...]

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  • Notice of Seizure and Information to Claimants Form AF

    Have you received a letter from Customs that looks like this http://twitpic.com/9j9rll ? U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the agency responsible for protecting our borders. Accordingly, Customs officials at seaports, airports, and other border crossings all over the U.S. have the authority to examine, detain, and/or seize merchandise entering or exiting the country. More often than not, importers and exporters are surprised and intimidated when they find out that the government has intervened in their business. As a result, it is best to provide my readers some basic knowledge in an[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Customs and Border Protection: Notice of Detention

    Customs is given broad authority to inspect shipments entering into the country.  When Customs questions the admissibility of goods into the United States, Customs has the authority to detain the shipment until satisfactory information is provided to enable release.  Customs has five (5) business days from the date on which the merchandise is presented for examination to decide whether or not to detain the merchandise or to allow its release.  If Customs decides to detain a shipment, they must provide the importer with a formal Notice of Detention within five[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Notice of Action CF-29

    When Customs believes that there should be a change in classification or an increase in duty they are required to issue what is called a "Notice of Action" - Customs Form 29. A notice of action signifies Customs intentions to change the way current and possibly future shipments will be treated. The notice will provide the importer with two possible Customs actions; "Action Taken" or "Action Proposed." 1. Action Taken - Once Customs indicates that Action has been taken, any increase in duties can only be addressed via protest or[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Customs and Border Protection- Liquidation

    Liquidation is the process through which Customs completes its review of an entry and finalizes its position as to the duties.   You may ask, what about those duties paid at the time of entry?  When duties are paid at the time of entry they are referred to as "deposits" because they are not considered Customs' final assessment of duties owed.  Generally, the entry remains "unliquidated" for a period of 314 days after the date of entry.  During this interim period the entry information may be revised regarding country of origin,[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Customs Entry Part I

    Importers are under the belief that when goods arrive at the port the importation process is over.  However, the arrival of goods at the port technically marks the beginning of entry process.  Documentation must be presented to Customs in order to facilitate the goods entry into the United States.  Documentation prepared for Customs is different depending on whether the goods are shipped by air, sea, or ground.  The length of the voyage to the United States can be lengthy, as such, information and/or documentation is provided to Customs prior to the arrival of goods[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Marking

    Generally, every imported or exported good is subject to marking regulations from at least one of the federal agencies. Marking requirements are enforced by physical inspection of the goods and also after release of the goods via a notice of redelivery and marking (CF4647). If Customs finds that marking is incorrect, they will delay the release of the goods until the marking is corrected. Incorrect markings can result in delays and high expenses for remarking goods or may result in a liquidated damages claim against the importer for failing to[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: U.S. Customs Took My Money at the Airport – Currency/Money Seizure

    Can U.S. Customs seize your money at the airport? Yes, if one failed to properly report all cash and cash equivalents transported into or out of the country. See Currency and Foreign Transaction Reporting Act (31 U.S.C. 5311, et seq.) When do I have to declare my money to Customs? Most people are uninformed of the reporting requirement however, “If you transport, attempt to transport, or cause to be transported (including by mail or other means) currency or other monetary instruments in an aggregate amount exceeding $10,000 or its foreign equivalent) at[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Declare Your Goods!

    Almost everything that your business imports into the U.S. must be declared to Customs. However, not all merchandise that enters the U.S. is subject to duty (tax or fee on imports) and/or importation restrictions. You must be careful because the failure to declare goods can result in civil penalties, customs seizures, forfeiture of your merchandise, and in some cases CRIMINAL LIABILITY! A failure to declare goods is not always intentional, it can happen by mistake through normal business practice. Customs does not understand the meaning of a "mistake," you will[...]

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