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Category: Customs Release

  • Liquidated Damages by Customs and Border Protection

    Liquidated Damages are predetermined civil penalties assessed against importers who have breached the terms of Customs bond.  These liquidated damages claims arise when an importer  fails to adhere to the Customs regulations and/or requests made by Customs on behalf of other government agencies (e.g. FDA). Specifically, a majority of the claims for liquidated damages stem from issues related to failure to redeliver goods, or improper  classification, valuation, or marking. Petitions for relief from liquidated damages must be filed within sixty (60) days from the date of mailing to the bond principal,[...]

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  • Notice of Seizure and Information to Claimants Form AF

    Have you received a letter from Customs that looks like this http://twitpic.com/9j9rll ? U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the agency responsible for protecting our borders. Accordingly, Customs officials at seaports, airports, and other border crossings all over the U.S. have the authority to examine, detain, and/or seize merchandise entering or exiting the country. More often than not, importers and exporters are surprised and intimidated when they find out that the government has intervened in their business. As a result, it is best to provide my readers some basic knowledge in an[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Customs and Border Protection: Notice of Detention

    Customs is given broad authority to inspect shipments entering into the country.  When Customs questions the admissibility of goods into the United States, Customs has the authority to detain the shipment until satisfactory information is provided to enable release.  Customs has five (5) business days from the date on which the merchandise is presented for examination to decide whether or not to detain the merchandise or to allow its release.  If Customs decides to detain a shipment, they must provide the importer with a formal Notice of Detention within five[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Request for Information – CF 28

    When goods are presented at the border for entry into the United States, Customs, at the point of liquidation, makes a final determination as to the classification and valuation, or other requirements pertaining to the imported goods. How does Customs make that determination? Customs uses the information provided by the importer such as the commercial invoice and other documentation at the time of entry. Issues arise when Customs finds that the information given to them is inaccurate, incomplete, or insufficient whereby Customs cannot formulate a decision. Customs may give the[...]

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  • Customs Attorney: Customs and Border Protection- Liquidation

    Liquidation is the process through which Customs completes its review of an entry and finalizes its position as to the duties.   You may ask, what about those duties paid at the time of entry?  When duties are paid at the time of entry they are referred to as "deposits" because they are not considered Customs' final assessment of duties owed.  Generally, the entry remains "unliquidated" for a period of 314 days after the date of entry.  During this interim period the entry information may be revised regarding country of origin,[...]

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